famous people’s death

Posted: March 23, 2013 in Current affairs
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Harry Reems: ‘Deep Throat’ co-star who found
God and became an estate agent

23 March 2013 12:00 AM

Reems at the launch in 2005 of the documentary about the film that made him notorious

‘Acting was my true love and I buried that possibility by going into adult films,’ he said

Mennea, above, crosses the line first in the Olympic 200 metres final in Moscow in 1980

Pietro Mennea: Olympic sprint champion whose 200 metres world record stood for 17 years

23 March 2013 12:00 AM

While some sprinters manage to look relaxed in action, he always looked frantic, almost fanatical

Jose Alfredo Martinez de Hoz, who died on 16 March at the age of 87, was a politician during the most brutal years of Argentina’s “dirty war” dictatorship

Jose Alfredo Martinez de Hoz: Politician involved in Argentina’s ‘dirty war’

23 March 2013 12:00 AM

Jose Alfredo Martinez de Hoz, who died on 16 March at the age of 87, was a politician during the most brutal years of Argentina’s “dirty war” dictatorship and architect of some of the country’s most infamous economic experiments.

James Herbert felt the horror genre was underrated in Britain: 'they take it seriously in America,' he said

James Herbert: Author whose talent for making the flesh creep sold tens of millions of books

21 March 2013 06:00 PM

James Herbert was a writer of horror books who turned a difficult childhood into a dark creativity which made him a best-selling author who specialised in making the flesh creep.

Adrian Hollis

Adrian Hollis: Classics don and chess grandmaster

21 March 2013 06:00 PM

Once famously described in the press as one of this country’s hidden chess assets, Adrian Hollis spent a long and distinguished academic career as a Classics Tutor and Fellow of Keble College, Oxford. There, amid research focussed largely on Hellenistic and Roman poetry, he bestrode the often narrow confines of his art with consummate ease.

Zillur is sworn in as his country’s 19th president in 2009

Zillur Rahman: Pioneer of Bangladeshi independence

21 March 2013 06:00 PM

In age and bitter experience, Bangladesh’s President Zillur Rahman exceeded every other major political figure alive today in the Indian subcontinent.

Richard and Sybil Burton at Victoria Station in 1955 befor esailing for New York on the ‘Queen Mary’

Sybil Christopher: Actress, theatre producer and first wife of Richard Burton

20 March 2013 05:30 PM

Sybil Christopher became the wife of Richard Burton at the age of just 20 and was married to him for fourteen years. During that time she experienced the entire gamut of emotions, from pleasure to pain and back again, that being married to the great and complex actor could bring. 

Montgomery: his views would make many of today’s Tories shudder

Sir Fergus Montgomery: Right-wing MP who served as Thatcher’s PPS

20 March 2013 05:30 PM

Sir Fergus Montgomery, the former Conservative MP, was Margaret Thatcher’s Parliamentary Private Secretary (1973-74) when she was Education Secretary and again (1975-76) when she was leader of the party in opposition. Thereafter he regularly invoked and traded on his relatively short time as Thatcher’s aide.

Marian Farhat, who died on 17 March aged 64, was a Palestinian lawmaker known as “the mother of martyrs”

Mariam Farhat: Hamas activist known as ‘the mother of martyrs’

20 March 2013 05:30 PM

Marian Farhat, who died on 17 March aged 64, was a Palestinian lawmaker known as “the mother of martyrs” who praised and supported three of her sons who were killed while carrying out deadly attacks against Israelis.

Hart: he moved the NAHT to the centre stage of education politics

Sir David Hart: Influential leader of Britain’s head teachers

20 March 2013 12:00 AM

A measure of Sir David Hart’s influence in government circles can be glimpsed by the following exchange in the early days of New Labour. Tony Blair’s education advisers were mulling over a potentially controversial education reform – there were murmurings about how it might be an anathema to the National Union of Teachers followed by silence. A voice, that of a senior adviser, piped up: “Ah, but what do the National Association of Head Teachers think about it?” The implication was that, if they too opposed it, it could be jettisoned to the history books.

Lightfoot and his New Orleans Jazzmen in 1964

Terry Lightfoot: Clarinettist and Trad jazz pioneer

20 March 2013 12:00 AM

Just before the advent of Beatlemania in 1963, the musical crazes were the twist and related dances from America and bright and breezy tunes from British jazz bands, known as Trad. “We can be credited with being the first band to use the word Trad”, claimed Terry Lightfoot, who formed his New Orleans Jazzmen in 1955, “Starting in 1959, we made a series of extended-play records which were called Trad, More Trad, Trad Again and Still Trad. I’m surprised we didn’t do a Son Of Trad as well.”

Worsley: with his dry wit, he was unflappable in tight situations

General Sir Richard Worsley: Soldier who oversaw the end of Britain’s presence in the Far East

20 March 2013 12:00 AM

Richard Worsley’s talents as a staff officer showed early, when he was appointed adjutant to 2 Rifle Brigade during the desperate battles for Italy in 1944, and carried him to the top, a place on the Army Board, by his career’s end more than 30 years later, as Quartermaster General to the Forces. In between he had helped to organise the end of Britain’s imperial commitments in the Far East, and masterminded much of her task in Germany during the years of the Cold War.

Olivier Metzner: Defence lawyer who became the most respected and feared of his generation

19 March 2013 12:00 AM

Olivier Metzner was a solitary man who adored, and brilliantly manipulated, publicity. He became the most respected and feared French defence lawyer of his generation, partly because he grasped that trials in the information age take place in the media, not just in the courtroom.

Frank Thornton: Actor forever remembered as Captain Peacock in ‘Are You Being Served?’

19 March 2013 12:00 AM

Few British character actors so typified their class more than Frank Thornton, whether looking scornfully down at Tony Hancock or berating the staff of Grace Brothers as the supercilious Captain Peacock from Are You Being Served? Towering as he did above most actors at six feet two inches, Thornton tended to be cast in comedies as aloof, somewhat superior characters, men in authority, all of which made him such a good foil for the likes of Hancock and Spike Milligan.

Professor Nigel Glendinning: Leading authority on Goya and 18th century Spanish literature

Professor Nigel Glendinning: Leading authority on Goya and 18th century Spanish literature

17 March 2013 08:26 PM

Recognition of his work on Goya came with his membership of Spain’s Academy of Fine Arts

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